Investigated Or Accused Of A Crime?

You and your friends thought that you’d be able to make some quick money selling leftover drugs that you had from surgeries you’d been through. The opioid medications are certainly in demand on the street, but it was a poor choice to try to sell there. The very first person who approached you was a police officer working undercover who noticed that you were carrying pills.

Long story short, you ended up getting arrested for trying to sell the pills to them. There isn’t any denying that you did it, but you do want to make sure that you defend yourself and have a chance to walk away with fewer penalties.

As a first-time offender, you may have options

Since this is your first offense, this is a good opportunity for your attorney to argue for alternative sentencing. You may not have been familiar with the laws that don’t allow you to sell medications, or perhaps you weren’t selling a large amount. Regardless of the situation, alternative penalties could be argued for depending on what exactly happened prior to the arrest.

Some potential alternatives to incarceration include:

  • Accelerated rehabilitation
  • The community service labor program
  • Probation
  • Treatment for drug-dependent individuals
  • Support though the alternative incarceration program

Why would a prosecutor consider alternatives to prison?

Prison isn’t the perfect solution for every crime. If you struggle with drug abuse, it makes more sense to spend that same money on getting you help with drug addiction treatment. Similarly, if you’re unlikely to violate the law again, probation or community service might be enough to penalize you for your first offense.

Your attorney will work closely with you to discuss any possible alternative sentencing options that may be open to you.